Us Army Compassionate Reassignment Request

Army Enlisted Compassionate Reassignments

Soldiers may be considered for a compassionate action when they have
extreme Family problems. The two types of Compassionate Requests are
when personal problems are:

1. Temporary (resolvable within one year)

2. Not expected to be solved in one year

A compassionate action may be a request for reassignment, deletion,
deferment or permissive attachment based on the soldier's circumstances.

Criteria and supporting documentation for Compassionate Actions are
outlined in AR 614-200 Chapter 5.

ASSIGNMENTS UNDER EMERGENCY CONDITIONS

Attachment authority for the purpose of processing a compassionate action
has been centralized at HRC. Local commanders are required to request
compassionate attachment using the compassionate attachment function on
the Enlisted Distribution and Assignment System (EDAS). DA HRC will
respond via EDAS authorizing or denying attachment or requesting
clarification or further information. A point of contact and valid phone number
must be included in the request. Initial attachment to allow a Soldier to
gather documentation for a compassionate request will be limited to 10 days.
All subsequent periods of further attachment must be requested and
approved by DA HRC. A Soldier must be in a leave status to request
permissive attachment for compassionate reasons.

RESPONSE TO COMPASSIONATE ACTION REQUESTS

DA HRC will respond to compassionate requests via EDAS vice electronic
message. Processing of compassionate requests is normally completed
within 7-21 days. Soldiers should check with their S-1 for status of request.

COMPASSIONATE REVIEW

Compassionate actions that involve medical issues will be reviewed by the
Office of the Surgeon General and a recommendation forwarded to DA HRC.
If the compassionate action pertains to a medical condition of the Soldier's
dependent, he/she should enroll in the Exceptional Family Member Program
(EFMP) or update the enrollment in the EFMP prior to forwarding the request
to HRC.

GENERAL COURT-MARTIALS CONVENING AUTHORITY (GCMA)

Only General Courts-Martial Convening Authorities (GCMA) can return a
compassionate reassignment request if they believe documentation is
insufficient. Otherwise, all requests will be forwarded to HRC for decision.

RECONSIDERATIONS

Soldiers are not authorized to submit more than one request for
reconsideration for the same or similar extreme Family problems.

MARRIED ARMY COUPLES PROGRAM (MACP)

When a Soldier enrolled in the MACP requests a compassionate action,
his/her spouse will receive automatic compassionate consideration unless
otherwise indicated in the remarks section of DA Form 3739, Application for
Compassionate Actions.

The point of contact is:
usarmy.knox.hrc.mbx.epmd-compassionate-section@mail.mil at COMM:
502-613-5860 or DSN: 983-5860. Please include grade, full name, SSN and
MOS with all e-mail requests.

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Military Humanitarian or Compassionate Assignments

Requesting Assignments for Extreme Family Problems

It's an unfortunate truth that sometimes during a military career, a member may experience a severe family hardship which requires his/her presence to resolve, with circumstances which make resolving it with emergency leave impractical.

To help military members in such situations, each of the services has developed a program which allows military members to be re-assigned, or temporarily deferred from assignment, if they have a severe family hardship which absolutely requires their presence to resolve.

The Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard call this program Humanitarian Assignments. The Army calls their program Compassionate Assignments.

Exceptional Family Member Program

While not a component of Humanitarian/Compassionate Assignments, the Exceptional Family Member Program or EFMP warrants special mention. EFMP was developed to make sure military family members (dependents) with special needs (medical, educational, etc.), receive the special attention they require. A small part of this program is integrated into the military assignments system.

When a military member has dependents (spouse, son, daughter, step-son, step-daughter, etc.) with special needs, they are enrolled in EFMP. If the member is selected for an accompanied assignment, one of the first things that happen is the EFMP folks at the losing base contact the EFMP folks at the projected gaining base to determine if the dependent's special needs can be adequately addressed at the new location.

If not, the assignment is canceled. This ensures that military dependents are not forced to move to locations where their special needs cannot be adequately addressed, either by the military installation or in the local community.

EFMP does not restrict a member from doing his/her share of unaccompanied assignments, however, so they can still deploy.

The program merely makes sure that members aren't selected for an accompanied assignment to areas where their dependents would not get the special attention they require.

Humanitarian/Compassionate Reassignments

A Humanitarian Assignment is a special assignment authorized to alleviate a hardship so severe an emergency leave cannot fully resolve it. While each of the services has different procedures, there are some requirements which are common to all the branches.

To qualify for a Humanitarian Assignment consideration, a military member must have a documented and substantiated problem involving a family member, which is significantly more severe than other military members experience. "Family Member" is generally defined as spouse, child, father, mother, father-in-law, mother-in-law, person in loco parentis or other persons residing in the household who are dependent for over half of their financial support. In the Coast Guard, father-in-law, and mother-in-law do not qualify as family members for the purposes of Humanitarian Assignments.

The problem must be able to be resolved within a specific time-frame (six months to two years, depending on the branch of service). Military members are expected to be available for worldwide assignment, at all times, according to the needs of the service.

That's a large part of why they get a paycheck. For those who have a permanent or prolonged family problem which prevents reassignment, humanitarian discharge is generally the appropriate action.

The Comptroller General has ruled that the military services cannot fund an assignment relocation for humanitarian reasons only. That means there must be a valid slot at the gaining base for the person's rank and job. For example, the Air Force would not be able to reassign an F-15 Fighter Aircraft Mechanic to a base that does not have slots for F-15 Fighter Aircraft Mechanics. However, sometimes a service will allow a member to re-train into a different job, in order to fill a required slot at the Humanitarian Assignment Location.

Army Compassionate Action Requests

The Army calls their Humanitarian Assignment Program "Compassionate Action Requests." Compassionate actions are requests from individual soldiers when personal problems exist.

The two types of compassionate requests are when personal problems are:

  • Temporary (resolvable within a year).
  • Not expected to be resolved within a year.

A reassignment may be authorized when there are extreme family problems and the soldier's presence is needed. A soldier may get a deletion or deferment from an overseas assignment if the problem requires them to stay in the U.S. for a short time.

If the problem is chronic or can't be resolved in a short amount of time, a compassionate discharge procedure is generally the most appropriate action. Consideration for reassignment may be given in cases of extreme family problems that are not expected to be resolved within a year if it meets the needs of the Army.

Requests are made on DA Form 3739, Application for Assignment/Deletion/Deferment for Extreme Family Problems submitted through the chain of command. This must be done by the soldier.  Commanders can disapprove compassionate requests when they clearly do not meet the prerequisites. The Army Personnel Command has approval authority for compassionate reassignment. 

Criteria for Compassionate Action

  • The soldier needs to be present to resolve the problem, and it can't be done with leave.
  • The problem cannot have been foreseen when the soldier last entered active duty.
  • A family member includes spouse, child, parent, minor brother or sister, person in loco parentis, or the only living blood relative of the soldier. If not one of those people, they must be documented as a dependent or, in the case of parents-in-law, no other member of the spouse's family can help.
  • For reassignment, a job (MOS) of the correct rank must be available at the requested installation.
  • A pending assignment may be deferred until the request is decided. However, soldiers in basic training will not be deferred from AIT pending the results.
  • The problem must be temporary and resolvable within one year, although longer deferments are sometimes approved.

Examples of Requests That Are Normally Approved

  • Death, rape, or severe psychotic episode of your spouse or minor child.
  • Terminal illness of an immediate family member whose doctor documents they are expected to pass within 12 months.
  • Major surgery for spouse or minor child which will have 12 months or less of recovery time.
  • If you were separated from your family due to military service (not negligence or misconduct) and your children are being placed in foster care.
  • Adoption if the child is being placed within 90 days and the adoption was initiated before notification of reassignment.
  • Soldiers en route from an accompanied OCONUS tour to an unaccompanied OCONUS tour may be deferred for up to 30 days. The deferment is for settlement of family when the soldier's presence is required for unforeseen problems.
  • A recent death of other family members with extenuating circumstances.

Examples of Requests That Are Normally Not Approved

  • You want to move to a new area.
  • Divorce or separation and legal actions relating to it, including child custody.
  • Gaining child custody in a divorce.
  • Sole parenthood.
  • Spouse's difficult pregnancy.
  • Family member's allergies.
  • Housing problems.
  • Financial problems.
  • Chronic problems relating to parents or parents-in-law.

If a compassionate action request is disapproved, a soldier may only request reconsideration for the same family emergency one time. If that is disapproved, there will be no further reconsideration.

For complete details about the Army's Compassionate Assignments Program, see Army Regulation 614-200, Enlisted Assignments and Utilization Management, paragraph 5-8.

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